Do you think anyone washes the wall?

mbk wall  Bjpg

Last spring I talked to a 5th grade class about the illustration and story in Talking Walls about the WALL in DC. We talked about Maya Lin and the polished granite and  since 1982 how so many  people have spent time at the wall.
I then asked the students if they had any comments  or questions and one boy told me he had a question. He was wondering if so many people visited the wall  and touched it with their hands and tears and then left things he thought the wall would be very dirty and wanted to know if anyone  ever washed it. I told him that no one had ever asked me that question before , but what did he think?. He was not sure and I told him it would be easy to find out, so I read this article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/washing-the-wall-to-remember-vietnam-vets/2011/05/09/AGJxZsCH_story.html and  when I was in DC  on a sunny spring day I helped to wash the wall. It was an amazing, moving experience to  join other volunteers  not only to wash a national monument, but also  to meet  and talk to veterans and tourists who came to visit the wall that day.  I took pictures back to the 5th graders and thanked the student  for his question and reminded them they too could wash the wall!

Chicago 10th grader wants to help her school know more about the African Continent

I have been corresponding with a 10th grader from Chicago who was born in Ethiopia and  contacted me after she had read my article http://www.margyburnsknight.com/teachafrica.html . She hopes to work with a few teachers to create an elective next year.  I told her on the phone that I would send her a her a copy of Africa is Not a Country and Talking Walls Discover Your World and when the books arrived be sure to read the last  sentence in Talking Walls, a Nelson Mandela quote. “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”